Inspiration for Shame?

General goings on in the 1966 Batman World

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Jim Akin
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Inspiration for Shame?

Post by Jim Akin » Tue Sep 10, 2013 8:30 am

The main inspiration for the character of Shame was obviously the Alan Ladd movie Shane, but an obituary I saw today makes me wonder if there also wasn't a more contemporary inspiration, which would have been familiar to Hollywood screenwriters -- and to SoCal BatFans -- during the original run of the series.

Image

As an East Coast kid, I never saw Cal Worthington's commercials, but I'm struck by his resemblance to Cliff Robertson as Shame in the linked photo. That, plus his presence as an Old West cowboy in mid-60s America, and the automotive angle to Shame's first caper, makes me wonder if inspiration might not have struck Stanley Ralph Ross during a late-night commercial break.

Do any board members remember Worthington's ads, or whether or not he was ever discussed in connection with Shame back in the day?

Cheers,

QQ

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Dr. Shimel
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Re: Inspiration for Shame?

Post by Dr. Shimel » Tue Sep 10, 2013 9:43 am

It's possible that Laughing Leo was a nod to him, albeit turning him into a sleazy character.

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Jim K, Bat fan
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Re: Inspiration for Shame?

Post by Jim K, Bat fan » Tue Sep 10, 2013 6:55 pm

I find this very interesting, and can certainly see the similarities. I do remember him, so maybe it is from his appearances on the Tonight Show, as I am also an East Coast kid.

Thanks for posting this intriguing piece of possible Bat history.

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High C
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Re: Inspiration for Shame?

Post by High C » Sat Sep 21, 2013 9:32 am

Interesting theory, QQ. I have no recollection of him, but it wouldn't have been unheard of for Dozier and Co. to get inspiration from commercials.

He obviously saw Adam's spot for Nestle Quik where he did a spy spoof, and Commander Edward Whitehead, the head of the Schweppes soda company, was the inspiration for Commodore Schmidlapp in the movie. In fact, they wanted to call him Commodore Redhead, but Schweppes said no.
'I thought Siren was perfect for Joan.'--Stanley Ralph Ross, writer of 'The Wail of the Siren'

My hobbies include gazing at the Siren and doing her bidding, evil or otherwise.

'She had a devastating, hypnotic effect on all the men.'--A schoolmate describing Joan Collins at age 17

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